In Canada, two publishers drop their holiday editions

In Canada, two publishers drop their holiday editions

[caption id="attachment_7471" align="alignright" width="275"]newspaper ad revenue Via The Economist and Alan D. Mutter (Newsosaur).[/caption] The Globe & Mail (Toronto) as well as the Calgary Herald, Edmonton Journal, Montreal Gazette and Ottawa Citizen will not put ink to paper on Monday, a Labour Day holiday north of the border as well as here. The rationale? Insufficient advertising revenue. Newspaper publishers have clung to their print editions because the advertising revenue remains greater there than it is online. And although online distribution is much less expensive than ink, paper and gasoline, digital ads are not sufficient to support the traditional newsroom. Reduced physical output is inevitable. But canceling an edition on such short notice is extraordinary. …continue reading →

Kindle Edition: Not A Purchase But A Long-Term Lease

[C]an you imagine if publishers said you couldn’t loan a book to a friend and let her keep it as a long as she likes? Donate it to Goodwill? Set it free through BookCrossing? Sell it on eBay or Amazon? We can do all of those things with a real book and none of them with a Kindle book.
  I bought my first Kindle-formatted mystery novel today. It was a pragmatic decision, but it wasn't really a purchase, even though that's how the publisher and Amazon present the deal. With Kindle editions we're really engaging in a long-term lease, not a purchase. And as a result, the rents charged by publishers, as a general rule, far exceed market value. But markets that lack competition (in this case, a lack of interoperability and proprietary formats) will have "rents" that are elevated relative to those that have competition (those with interoperability a.k.a. substitution). Let's back up a minute. I'm not a troglodyte. I love books (dead tree editions). …continue reading →
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