My Life With Apple

In 1984, I convinced my about-to-be (then) husband not to buy a Macintosh ($2,495/$5,440 in 2011 $). It wasn’t just because it was expensive. It wasn’t interoperable, you see, and the dairy cooperative we worked for was an IBM shop. Mainframes and IBM PCs (not clones) didn’t talk to Macs. Heck, Microsoft Word wasn’t around […]

Thinking Portability: The Osborne 1 Is 30 Today

It was early 1984. Apple had just released the Macintosh, but IBM (and its partner/stepchild/competitor Microsoft) had jumped into the nascent personal computer market in mid-1981 with the IBM PC. However, the tried-and-true operating system (or tired-and-old, depending on your point of view) of the day was not DOS but CP/M. Somehow I convinced my […]

Thinking Visually: IBM Circa 1975

I remember the pre-PowerPoint days, and the challenges of creating slide presentations: 35 mm slides created by hand and with computerized augmentation. Here’s a great presentation (wish we had the speaker notes!) ostensibly from IBM (1975). I use “great” because of color and design that feels almost modern and Zen-like (Garr Reynolds). I say “ostensibly” […]

Looking Back To Look Forward: Scientific American, 1991

Almost 20 years ago, Scientific American dedicated a special issue to Communications, Computers and Networks. The September issue of Current Cities, a technology watch e-newsletter edited by David F.W. Robison at the University of California Berkeley, advised readers to buy a copy: Scientific American Special Issue on Communications, Computers and Networks 265(3) (September 1991). If […]